Are Exercise Recommendations Really Enough to Protect the Heart?

When it comes to preventing heart failure, even the recommended amounts may not be enough, finds a new study

Being inactive is solidly linked to heart problems like heart attack and stroke, and exercise can help lower risk factors—such as high blood pressure and narrowed blood vessels—that are connected to those heart events.

But when it comes to another type of heart condition, heart failure, the effect of physical activity isn’t as clear. If coronary heart disease can be traced to more physical issues, such as blocked arteries or excessive pressure from blood pumping around the body, heart failure is more of a body-wide problem affecting not just the heart but almost every tissue.

In heart failure, the heart gradually loses its ability to effectively pump oxygen-rich blood to the rest of the body, and it can’t keep up with supplying muscles and cells with what they need to function properly. 5.1 million people in U.S. have heart failure.

Source: Are Exercise Recommendations Really Enough to Protect the Heart? | TIME

Don’t Ignore These Early Signs Of Heart Disease In Men | Michael Lazar

Early Signs Of Heart Disease In Men

While many men may be unaware that they suffer from heart disease until a major incident, like a heart attack, occurs, there are several red flags that you should be aware of to better detect problems with the heart during the earliest and most treatable phases, explains WebMD.

The early stages of heart disease may have come-and-go symptoms that include:

Out of breath after moderate exercise, like climbing stairs.

A feeling of achiness or squeezing in the chest that can last 30 minutes or longer.

Pain in the upper extremities that can’t be explained.

Sometimes heart disease is caused by blood vessels. Key early signs include:

Chest pain

Shortened breath

Pain or tingling in the upper extremities

These symptoms could mean that your blood vessels have narrowed and are constricted. This can sometimes be caused by the build-up of plaque, which forces the heart to work harder to pump blood.

via Don’t Ignore These Early Signs Of Heart Disease In Men | Michael Lazar.

Coronary Artery Disease Risk among Obese Metabolically Healthy Young Men.

Send to:

Eur J Endocrinol. 2015 Jun 3. pii: EJE-15-0284. [Epub ahead of print]

Coronary Artery Disease Risk among Obese Metabolically Healthy Young Men.

Twig G1, Gerstein H2, Ben-Ami Shor D3, Derazne E4, Tzur D5, Afek A6, Tirosh A7.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The aim of this study was to assess CAD risk among obese young men without metabolic risk factors.

DESIGN:

longitudinal study in a historical cohort Methods: Incident CAD during a median follow-up of 6.1 years was assessed among 31,684 young men (mean age 31.2±5.7 years) of the Metabolic, Lifestyle and Nutrition Assessment in Young Adults (MELANY) cohort. Participants were categorized by BMI and the number of metabolic abnormalities (based on the Adult Treatment Panel-III). Metabolically healthy (MH) obesity was defined as BMI≥30 kg/m2 in the presence of normal blood pressure and normal levels of fasting glucose, triglyceride and HDL-cholesterol levels (n=599; 1.9%). Cox proportional hazard models were applied.

RESULTS:

There were 198 new cases of CAD that were diagnosed during 209,971 person-years of follow-up, of which 6 cases occurred among MH obese. The incidence of CAD among MH lean, overweight and obese participates was 0.23, 0.45 and 1.0 per 1,000 person-years, respectively. In a multivariable model adjusted for clinical and biochemical CAD risk factors, a higher CAD risk was observed among MH-obese (HR=3.08; 95%CI=1.10-8.68, p=0.033), compared to MH-normal weight subjects. This risk persisted when BMI was treated as a time-dependent variable, or when fasting glucose, HDL-cholesterol, triglycerides or blood pressure were added to the model. Similar results were also obtained when a more permissive definition of metabolic health was used.

CONCLUSIONS:

Obesity may continue to contribute to increased risk for incident CAD in young men even in the presence of a healthy metabolic profile.

PMID: 26041076 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

via Coronary Artery Disease Risk among Obese Metabolically Healthy Young Men. – PubMed – NCBI.

Snow shoveling: How to avoid a heart attack – WTOP

“Shoveling snow can, in fact, precipitate a heart attack, and it does for thousands of Americans every year,” says Dr. Warren Levy, chief medical officer of Virginia Heart, one of the largest cardiology practices in the region.

He says shoveling snow involves a level of exertion that most of us just are not used to and don’t do on a daily basis.

“It is the same sort of trouble people get into [when they] have never exercised and decide to suddenly train for a marathon,” Levy explained.

People most likely to have problems while shoveling snow are those already diagnosed with heart disease, or who have significant risk factors, such as high blood pressure, obesity, diabetes, cigarette smoking, a strong family history or a sedentary lifestyle.

Read more at Snow shoveling: How to avoid a heart attack – WTOP.

Heart failure symptoms easy to miss for unsuspecting patients – Chicago Tribune

“I have hardly been sick a day in my life. I take vitamins, try homeopathic remedies and have a great immune system,” says Kilian, 53.However, little did she know while treating her flu/bronchitis symptoms at home in November 2013, that she would end up in the hospital for nearly three weeks.”

Over the winter, I just wasn’t getting better,” says Kilian. “I was having trouble breathing and was starting to feel like I was gaining weight from eating healthy foods to keep my strength up. But, in reality, I was retaining fluid from heart failure.”

Kilian said that her water retention started out slowly, but it became more rapid as her symptoms progressed. Eventually, her brother, who lives in Naperville, brought her to the Elmhurst Memorial Hospital Emergency Department.”

The doctors were shocked at the amount of fluid that I had around my heart. I ended up with a pacemaker in the process,” says Kilian.

Read the entire article at Heart failure symptoms easy to miss for unsuspecting patients – Chicago Tribune.

Big Step in regenerating the heart muscle

A remarkable discovery in heart research was made by scientists at the Fraunhofer Institute for Interfacial Engineering and Biotechnology IGB in Stuttgart: they found the surface markers of cardiovascular functional living progenitor cells CPCs. This discovery is extremely important for heart research because it demonstrates that the cardiovascular progenitor cells CPCs can be derived from induced pluripotent stem cells, iPS cells. Investigation results were recently published in the journal PLoS ONE.

Progenitor cells are cells that are normally found only in the fetus and have the ability to develop into all cell types of the heart: cardiomyocytes, etc. The goal of the study led by Prof. Dr. Katja Schenke-by Layland from the Fraunhofer Institute for Interfacial Engineering and Biotechnology IGB in Stuttgart, was to produce functional cardiomyocytes from progenitor cells. Cardiomyocytes are heart muscle cells that play an essential role in contraction. Myocardial infarction leads to loss of functional cardiomyocytes. As a result of a blockage of a coronary artery, myocardium served by that artery will not be supplied with oxygen anymore, thus it will die. A frequent consequence of patients who suffer a heart attack is heart failure, which means decreased ability of the heart contraction.

Read more at Big Step in regenerating the heart muscle.

Heart Of The Matter: Treating The Disease Instead Of The Person : Shots – Health News : NPR

Many times patients and doctors see the same hospital visit through different eyes.

This NPR article discusses the importance of seeing things from both sides…

 

Heart Of The Matter: Treating The Disease Instead Of The Person : Shots – Health News : NPR.