Yogurt and Diabetes: Overview of Recent Observational Studies

Whew!  At first I thought this might be bad news like so many of these news items seem to be. Coffee is bad for you! Coffee is good for you!…

I’m a huge fan of yogurt and have made my own for many decades, so I was very glad to find nothing bad here.

 

 

Salas–Salvado J, et al. – Analysis of observational studies was performed to determine the association between yogurt consumption and type 2 diabetes, along with possible mechanisms involved. Findings reported that in healthy and older adults at high cardiovascular risk, yogurt consumption, in the context of a healthy dietary pattern, may reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes.

  • Researchers performed a review of observational studies and found that 13 prospective studies assessed the link between yogurt intake and type 2 diabetes, most of which demonstrated an inverse association between the frequency of yogurt consumption and the risk of diabetes.
  • Combined data including scientific evidence accumulated from individual prospective studies and several meta-analyses have shown that yogurt consumption has a potential role in diabetes prevention.
  • According to the most recent analysis, a 14% lower risk of type 2 diabetes was observed when yogurt consumption was 80–125 g/d compared with no yogurt consumption.
  • It was reported that intake of fermented dairy products, especially yogurt, has been inversely associated with variables of glucose metabolism.
  • Data also suggested that yogurt may have probiotic effects that could modulate glucose metabolism.

From https://www.mdlinx.com/family-medicine/medical-news-article/2017/06/21/yogurt-type-2-diabetes-insulin-sensitivity/7213515/?category=latest&page_id=1&utm_source=in-house&utm_medium=message&utm_campaign=tmn-june17-peds

Big Step in regenerating the heart muscle

A remarkable discovery in heart research was made by scientists at the Fraunhofer Institute for Interfacial Engineering and Biotechnology IGB in Stuttgart: they found the surface markers of cardiovascular functional living progenitor cells CPCs. This discovery is extremely important for heart research because it demonstrates that the cardiovascular progenitor cells CPCs can be derived from induced pluripotent stem cells, iPS cells. Investigation results were recently published in the journal PLoS ONE.

Progenitor cells are cells that are normally found only in the fetus and have the ability to develop into all cell types of the heart: cardiomyocytes, etc. The goal of the study led by Prof. Dr. Katja Schenke-by Layland from the Fraunhofer Institute for Interfacial Engineering and Biotechnology IGB in Stuttgart, was to produce functional cardiomyocytes from progenitor cells. Cardiomyocytes are heart muscle cells that play an essential role in contraction. Myocardial infarction leads to loss of functional cardiomyocytes. As a result of a blockage of a coronary artery, myocardium served by that artery will not be supplied with oxygen anymore, thus it will die. A frequent consequence of patients who suffer a heart attack is heart failure, which means decreased ability of the heart contraction.

Read more at Big Step in regenerating the heart muscle.