The enemy is not death. The enemy is needless suffering

I love this quote and I wish more doctors would understand this:

It is your life. As your doctor, my job is to guide, not order or command. It is about you, not me. You are the patient. I am the teacher and healer.

Source: The enemy is not death. The enemy is needless suffering

FREE Patient and Survivor Conference in Northern California!

Other Stuff, Part 2: Kidney Cancer

 

 

From the Kidney Cancer Association:

 

REGISTER FOR FREE NOW!

2015 Kidney Cancer Association
Patient & Survivor Conference – Northern California

Saturday, August 15, 2015
8:00am – 3:00pm

Stanford Cancer Center

875 Blake Wilbur Drive, Palo Alto, CA 94304

Agenda has been posted. Click here to register for FREE today!

Learn about the latest treatments for kidney cancer, clinical trials and nutrition.

This conference is open to all patients, survivors, caregivers and family members. There is no cost to attend.

 Click here to register!

Click here for a list of nearby hotels. 

Please contact help@kidneycancer.org with questions or for more information.

Heart Of The Matter: Treating The Disease Instead Of The Person : Shots – Health News : NPR

Many times patients and doctors see the same hospital visit through different eyes.

This NPR article discusses the importance of seeing things from both sides…

 

Heart Of The Matter: Treating The Disease Instead Of The Person : Shots – Health News : NPR.

Tips For Visitors

Hospital

 

These are based on our personal experiences and may not apply to every situation.  If you have other tips, please add them to the comments section and I’ll edit this post.

Call before dropping by. The patient (or caretaker) may be napping and not up to entertaining visitors

Send an email before calling. The sound of the phone ringing can be disruptive.  I turned off all the ringers but one  in our house and that one is very low.

Leave a voicemail.  Then we can get back to you when it’s more convenient.

Don’t be general with things such as “call me if you need anything”. People like me will never call – unless that’s what you’re really hoping for.  Instead say something like “I’m bringing you dinner tomorrow night.  What are your dietary restrictions?”  Or “I will sit with the patient on Saturday for 10-2 so you can get out of the house for a while”.

Limit your visit to 20 minutes or so. Twenty minutes may not seem very long, but plan for your visit to end promptly at the twenty minute mark unless the patient invites you to stay longer. Being hospitalized is exhausting and staying awake to entertain visitors can be draining.

Do not tell the patient about other friends or relatives who had the same surgery/disease but didn’t survive.

When talking with the patient, don’t expect him or her to solve YOUR problems. Leave those outside and focus on the patient.

Be SURE the patient isn’t allergic to flowers before sending them.  By the same token, don’t wear perfume, cologne or shaving lotion.  The patient may be allergic to those scents.

Don’t wake up a sleeping patient.

If a nurse or doctor wishes to speak with the patient, leave the room to give them privacy.

Do not use this time to text or make phone calls.  Pay attention to the patient.