World Kidney Day


Chronic kidney disease affects more women than men, but most people with this condition don’t know they have it. This World Kidney Day, the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), part of the National Institutes of Health, joins organizations around the world in urging women to take action to prevent kidney disease — for themselves and their loved ones.

Healthy lifestyle changes can help prevent and manage kidney disease and its main causes — diabetes and high blood pressure. One in seven Americans has chronic kidney disease, or CKD, a condition that can lead to kidney failure and means your kidneys are damaged and can’t filter blood the way they should. CKD affects 16 percent of women and 13 percent of men. Approximately 700,000 people in the United States have kidney failure treated with dialysis or a kidney transplant.

Given the impact of kidney disease on women, the NIDDK encourages all women to learn about risk factors and talk with health care professionals. Taking action now can help protect your kidneys. Here are ways to reduce your risk:

  • Choose healthier foods, such as fresh fruits, fresh or frozen vegetables, whole grains, and low-fat or fat-free dairy products.
  • Be physically active for 30 minutes or more on most days.
  • Reduce screen time, and aim for 7 to 8 hours of sleep each night.
  • Join family, friends, or coworkers in encouraging each other to stick to a healthy routine.
  • Use the NIH Body Weight Planner to help achieve and stay at a healthy weight.

NIDDK-funded research continues to examine how lifestyle changes affect kidney disease, diabetes, and more. The Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort(link is external) is an ongoing observational study looking at a wide spectrum of kidney disease topics, such as the risk factors for loss of kidney function and the link between kidney and heart disease. The Sit Less, Interact, Move More Intervention for Sedentary Behavior in Chronic Kidney Disease clinical trial is recruiting participants with CKD to find out whether decreasing time spent sitting and increasing walking time will result in less belly fat and improved physical function and quality of life.

The NIDDK conducts and supports research on diabetes and other endocrine and metabolic diseases; digestive diseases, nutrition, and obesity; and kidney, urologic, and hematologic diseases. Spanning the full spectrum of medicine and afflicting people of all ages and ethnic groups, these diseases encompass some of the most common, severe, and disabling conditions affecting Americans. For more information about the NIDDK and its programs, visit

About the National Institutes of Health (NIH): NIH, the nation’s medical research agency, includes 27 Institutes and Centers and is a component of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. NIH is the primary federal agency conducting and supporting basic, clinical, and translational medical research, and is investigating the causes, treatments, and cures for both common and rare diseases. For more information about NIH and its programs, visit


8 Energy Boosters to Beat Menopause Fatigue

Menopause got you dragging? Here are a few simple ways to fight menopause energy drain and regain your oomph.

If you’re like many women, you’ll probably experience bothersome symptoms during menopause — one of which may be fatigue. Fatigue is a common menopause complaint, especially in the early stages of menopause, as your body adjusts to its new chemistry.

But low energy can be also caused by number of other medical conditions, including anemia, coronary artery disease, diabetes, heart failure, hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, and kidney or liver disease. If you are fatigued, “you should talk to your doctor just to be sure it’s a menopause symptom,” says Wendy Klein, MD, associate professor emeritus of internal medicine, obstetrics, and gynecology and chair of the Women’s Health Conference at the Virgina Commonwealth University School of Medicine.

“Most women don’t need treatment for their menopause symptoms,” Klein says. “The majority of women will have symptoms that are transient. They last two or three years and abate by themselves.” But there are lifestyle changes you can make to help relieve symptoms you may experience.

If you’re dealing with fatigue as you go through menopause, try these eight simple tricks to boost low energy:

1. Exercise daily. You should aim for at least 30 — and preferably 60 — minutes of exercise most days of the week. Exercising may be the last thing you want to do when you’re feeling weak or tired, but exercise actually boosts your energy, says Staness Jonekos, who co-authored The Menopause Makeover with Dr. Klein. “Exercise is your fountain of youth,” Jonekos says. “It produces those feel-good hormones and gives you the energy you’re looking for when you’re not feeling good.” Some people find it helps to exercise earlier in the day rather than close to bedtime.

2. Cap caffeine and alcohol consumption. Caffeine and alcohol can both affect energy levels and interfere with getting a good night’s sleep if you indulge in the evening. They may give you an immediate rush, but when they wear off, they can leave you feeling more drained than before. Nicotine can also have this effect, so if you smoke, quit. You’ll find you have more energy without artificial stimulants.

3. Limit food portions. Being overweight during menopause can cause you to feel sluggish. The best diet is one that is rich in fruits, vegetables, and whole grains and that includes lean sources of protein (poultry, lean meats, and fish) and low- or no-fat dairy products. Limit the amount of fats and sweets you eat. Eating smaller meals more frequently can provide energy throughout the day, Jonekos says. But if you eat more often, be sure you’re not overeating — watch your total calories.

4. Embrace relaxation. How do you unwind? Whether you like to read, take long walks, or meditate, take the time to indulge in your favorite activities. “You’re entitled to pamper yourself and take time for yourself,” Jonekos says. “As a result, you will be more energetic.” Stress and anxiety could be causing your fatigue, and relaxation techniques can be very helpful in learning to overcome them. A study published in Menopause: The Journal of the North American Menopause Society shows that stress-reduction therapy may also help with menopause symptoms, decreasing the degree to which women were bothered by hot flashes by 22 percent.

5. Get your Zzz’s. Another menopause symptom is hot flashes or night sweats, which can keep you up at night. Restful sleep is important during menopause so you’re not overly tired during the day. This may require keeping your bedroom cooler than you usually do. Use a ceiling fan and wear lighter bed clothes. Make sure the room is dark and set your body clock by going to bed and waking up around the same time every day — even on weekends.

6. Stay hydrated. “You need to nourish your body with healthy food and water,” Jonekos says. Thirst is your body’s way of telling you that you need more fluid. When you’re dehydrated, your body has to work harder to perform, which can lead to fatigue. Dehydration also can cause nausea and difficulty concentrating. Keep a water bottle handy so you can drink when you’re thirsty. Choose water or caffeine-free tea or coffee — not calorie-laden drinks, as weight gain can make you sluggish.

7. Don’t overbook. You may be fatigued because you’re trying to do too much. Learn to say no. Know your limits and what you can and can’t accomplish in a day. Also, if you set reasonable limits, you’ll be less stressed, Jonekos says.

8. Try herbal remedies. Two herbal remedies that may help reduce menopause symptoms that can cause fatigue and anxiety are black cohosh and valerian. Talk to your doctor before taking herbs as teas or supplements as they can interfere with some medications.

“No one recipe fits everyone,” Jonekos says. “But if you’re suffering from fatigue during menopause, you need to take control, and you can do that by adopting a healthy lifestyle.” Eat right, exercise, get adequate sleep, and learn to relax — you will find you have more energy to enjoy your life.