Two Weeks After CABG

Sounds like a fairy tale of some kind involving veggies like cabbage, lettuce and other greenery.  But it’s not.  CABG is the abbreviation for Coronary artery bypass grafting, something I had no idea about 2 weeks ago.

CABG

DH had 3 of those grafts, the mammary artery and 2 from his leg vein.

From NIH:

Coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) is a type of surgery that improves blood flow to the heart. Surgeons use CABG to treat people who have severe coronary heart disease (CHD).

CHD is a disease in which a waxy substance called plaque (plak) builds up inside the coronary arteries. These arteries supply oxygen-rich blood to your heart.

Over time, plaque can harden or rupture (break open). Hardened plaque narrows the coronary arteries and reduces the flow of oxygen-rich blood to the heart. This can cause chest pain or discomfort called angina< (an-JI-nuh or AN-juh-nuh).

If the plaque ruptures, a blood clot can form on its surface. A large blood clot can mostly or completely block blood flow through a coronary artery. This is the most common cause of a heart attack. Over time, ruptured plaque also hardens and narrows the coronary arteries.

CABG is one treatment for CHD. During CABG, a healthy artery or vein from the body is connected, or grafted, to the blocked coronary artery. The grafted artery or vein bypasses (that is, goes around) the blocked portion of the coronary artery. This creates a new path for oxygen-rich blood to flow to the heart muscle.

Surgeons can bypass multiple coronary arteries during one surgery.

I have to say it’s amazing how quickly the body can begin to heal after such an assault.  So far, we’ve seen the surgeon’s nurse practitioner and the visiting nurse.  Both say he’s doing very well for such a short amount of time.

There’s still some pain, some coughing, and other inconveniences but it’s amazing what modern medicine can do!